Hi-YIELD
BIOFERTILZER

MADE FROM REPURPOSED HORSE WASTE

HiPoint’s biomass is created using an accelerated bioreactor to produce Biofertilizers with biochar sold in bulk or bags. This process, when compared to traditional composting (that uses outdoor windrows), saves time, decreases land use acquisition, and prevents leaching and off-gassing into the environment.


HI-YIELD

BIOFERTILIZER
Made from repurposed Horse Waste
HiPoint’s biomass is created using an accelerated bioreactor to produce Biofertilizers with biochar sold in bulk or bags. This process, when compared to traditional composting (that uses outdoor windrows), saves time, decreases land use acquisition, and prevents leaching and off-gassing into the environment.


Hi-Yield biofertilizer

 

MANUFACTURED LOCALLY IN AGRICULTURE FOR AGRICULTURE


Hi-YIELD BIOFERTILIZER

MANUFACTURED LOCALLY FOR AGRICULTURE FROM AGRICULTURE

Premium quality

In our process, the lignocellulosic biomass and organic matter (volatile solids) are separated and processed independently, leaving the remaining product composed of manure buns, water, fines, and organic dust to reach the bioreactors. This results in hi-grade organic matter biofertilizer in as little as five days.
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Premium quality

In our process, the lignocellulosic biomass and organic matter (volatile solids) are separated and processed independently, leaving the remaining product composed of manure buns, water, fines, and organic dust to reach the bioreactors. This results in hi-grade organic matter biofertilizer in as little as five days.

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Bioreactor Process

The manure buns and organic matter fines are processed in a covered bioreactor to become inert and cured to be used as a biofuel, or digestate for energy and gas production in Anaerobic Digesters or as an organic matter soil amendment. Unlike most composting operations that can take a year to breakdown wood shavings, our bioreactor can do it in 5 days, saving time, land, and money.

Bioreactor Process

The manure buns and organic matter fines are processed in a covered bioreactor to become inert and cured to be used as a biofuel, or digestate for energy and gas production in Anaerobic Digesters or as an organic matter soil amendment. Unlike most composting operations that can take a year to breakdown wood shavings, our bioreactor can do it in 5 days, saving time, land, and money.
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Non-Labial Biochar

We produce biochar by heating biomass with low moisture levels. We use horse stall residual waste; however, we can also use corn stover, hemp flour, and green waste. Plus, a small percentage of plastic horse bags can be added. By adjusting moisture levels, we can get a maximum 30% biochar output. Our biochar is chemical-free and ash-free, making it safe to add to HiPoints organic matter Biofertilizer. The result is an increase in soil fertility and nutrient availability. Biochar is also useful for removing contaminants and mitigating drought, making it valuable for waste management and wastewater treatment.

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Non-Labial Biochar

We produce biochar by heating biomass with low moisture levels. We use horse stall residual waste; however, we can also use corn stover, hemp flour, and green waste. Plus, a small percentage of plastic horse bags can be added. By adjusting moisture levels, we can get a maximum 30% biochar output. Our biochar is chemical-free and ash-free, making it safe to add to HiPoints organic matter Biofertilizer. The result is an increase in soil fertility and nutrient availability. Biochar is also useful for removing contaminants and mitigating drought, making it valuable for waste management and wastewater treatment.
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NPK Balanced. Hi-Yield. BioFertilizer with Biochar.

What Is Biochar & Why does HiPoint add it to Biofertilizer

Biochar systems are complex and require further research and life cycle analysis to understand the opportunities and risks associated with them in developing countries. Four main factors need to be considered:

1. Impacts on soil health and agricultural productivity, such as soil pH, nutrient availability, soil moisture, soil organic matter, and the amount of biochar applied.

2. Impacts on climate change, including carbon storage and stabilization, which are the most important factors for climate change mitigation efforts based on biochar. Biomass cookstoves are significant sources of black carbon, which could have a global impact on the climate and human health. The risks of negative climate impact related to biochar lie primarily in the negative feedback that may occur during biochar production and application, such as emissions of methane and nitrous oxide during inefficient pyrolysis and degradation of soil organic matter after biochar application.

ref: greenfacts.org edited AI to shorten

3. Social impacts, including effects on energy, health, economics, and food security. Biochar use can reduce pressure on wooded ecosystems and decrease the burden of fuel gathering. Improved cookstoves can also reduce indoor air pollution throughout the developing world, especially for women and children. In addition, biochar systems could help buffer practitioners against crop shortages and hunger by improving crop yields or crop resilience. The energy produced from biochar could potentially be used for critical functions such as the refrigeration of vaccines, water pumping, and lighting after sunset. Risks of biochar use can include potential emission of toxins and inhalation of dust and small particulate matter.

4. Competing uses of biomass. The use of dedicated energy crops for biochar production could divert food crops for fuel production, divert arable land from food crops, and affect direct and indirect land use change. The costs and benefits must, therefore, be weighed, of leaving biomass in situ versus using it to produce biochar that is then added to the soil. Biochar is one of the few GHG reduction strategies that can actually withdraw carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. It has significant advantages but can have an overall net climate impact.

What Is Biochar & Why does HiPoint add it to Biofertilizer

Biochar systems are complex and require further research and life cycle analysis to understand the opportunities and risks associated with them in developing countries. Four main factors need to be considered:

1. Impacts on soil health and agricultural productivity, such as soil pH, nutrient availability, soil moisture, soil organic matter, and the amount of biochar applied.

2. Impacts on climate change, including carbon storage and stabilization, which are the most important factors for climate change mitigation efforts based on biochar. Biomass cookstoves are significant sources of black carbon, which could have a global impact on the climate and human health. The risks of negative climate impact related to biochar lie primarily in the negative feedback that may occur during biochar production and application, such as emissions of methane and nitrous oxide during inefficient pyrolysis and degradation of soil organic matter after biochar application.

3. Social impacts, including effects on energy, health, economics, and food security. Biochar use can reduce pressure on wooded ecosystems and decrease the burden of fuel gathering. Improved cookstoves can also reduce indoor air pollution throughout the developing world, especially for women and children. In addition, biochar systems could help buffer practitioners against crop shortages and hunger by improving crop yields or crop resilience. The energy produced from biochar could potentially be used for critical functions such as the refrigeration of vaccines, water pumping, and lighting after sunset. Risks of biochar use can include potential emission of toxins and inhalation of dust and small particulate matter.

4. Competing uses of biomass. The use of dedicated energy crops for biochar production could divert food crops for fuel production, divert arable land from food crops, and affect direct and indirect land use change. The costs and benefits must, therefore, be weighed, of leaving biomass in situ versus using it to produce biochar that is then added to the soil. Biochar is one of the few GHG reduction strategies that can actually withdraw carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. It has significant advantages, but the overall net climate impact of biochar requires a full life-cycle assessment to determine whether it is beneficial or not.